3743 North 24th Street, Phoenix, Arizona 85016 ROC #279144    Call Us: (602)­ 707-1572

New Arizona rules look to curtail rampant copper thefts

Great news for our customers!

5/8/9 Article by Mike Sunnucks, Senior Reporter, Phoenix Business Journal

The state of Arizona has approved new rules on scrap metal dealers aimed at curbing copper and other metal thefts that have plagued commercial property owners, businesses and even churches and schools.

Gov. Jan Brewer has signed into law a measure that requires scrap metal dealers to register with the Arizona Department of Public Safety and keep track of transactions of more than $25, including photographing the metals brought in and fingerprinting sellers.

Business owners who violate the new regulations could face fines of between $500 and $2,500 per violation as well as six months in jail and loss of operating licenses. The rules do not apply to recycled beverage cans.

Copper and other metal thefts are a big problem for a host of businesses and property owners. Theft rings steal copper parts from air conditioning units, plumbing and electrical fixtures and other businesses often to feed illegal drug habits.

Everything from new home developments to churches and schools have been victimized. The thieves sometimes only get small amounts of copper from their actions but cause thousands of dollars in damages.

Property owners, including local commercial landlord Michael Pollack, have been pushing new rules on metal recyclers to try and curb the sale of stolen copper.

State prosecutors and police late last month broke up a $10 million organized theft ring that allegedly stole raw copper from an Asarco LLC mine in Hayden, Ariz. The ring allegedly stole copper by the truckloads from the mine, some of which ended up being sold to recyclers. The stolen copper was blackened so it looked like scrap metal and was shipped from Los Angeles to the Chinese black market.

Clothing donations for AWEE – find out how you can help!

For the last 30 years, Arizona Women’s Education & Employment has been transforming the lives of women, men and youths around the Valley. The organization works with people returning to work after having been victims of domestic violence, spending time in jail, living on the streets or being affected by other problems that have left them unable to work. AWEE uses a highly personalized program to help individuals acquire job skills, apply for jobs, teach financial independence and provide other forms of assistance, such as clothing and housing. Throughout its existence, AWEE has helped more than 115,000 men and women.

Each spring, a support and fundraising group known as ‘Friends of AWEE’ hosts an event titled “Cocktails & Clothing” that encourages the donation of gently used business and casual clothing, briefcases, and shoes. Donated clothes will be used to help less fortunate Arizonans get back on their feet and assist them in moving toward a bright future.

Sonoran Property Maintenance, LLC is a ‘Pearl’ level sponsor of this year’s event, which is taking place at the Adobe Grill at the Arizona Biltmore Golf Club on Tuesday, March 5th from 4:30-7 p.m. Here is an invitation to the Cocktails and Clothing event:   http://www.scribd.com/doc/126069985/Invitation-to-AWEE-Clothing-Cocktails-2013

All are welcome to attend this enjoyable event, at which a live auction and raffle will take place. Just ask anyone who has attended an AWEE fundraiser before – their high-energy events are always exciting and a great way to connect with other supporters.

Sonoran Property Maintenance, LLC will pick up clothing donations from your location. Tax receipt forms will be provided upon pickup, and donations will be made in your name. Pick-ups are scheduled for Friday, February 22nd and Friday, March 1st.

To schedule a pickup, please contact Liz Paquette at lizpaquette@sonpmc.com or call Sonoran’s office at (602) 707-1572.

With your help, we can help transform the lives of Arizonans for the better!

Helping the Homeless

In the past year, we have seen a rise in the presence of homeless at the properties we serve, and we deal with the people and issues first hand.  You might see them at your properties and wonder, “What can I do to help them?” If we can refer them to local organizations whose mission is to assist the homeless, then it’s a win-win situation. You’ll have a cleaner property, and the less fortunate will benefit from the aid available in our local communities.

SPREAD THE WORD!  Contribute with a “Working Poor” tax credit.
Arizona allows tax payers a credit for contributing to local non-profit organizations that help the homeless.  Through the “Working Poor” tax credit, a single filer can receive a maximum credit of $200, and joint tax filers can receive a credit of up to $400. Donations must be made to eligible organizations, and you can find a list of those that qualify for 2012 tax returns here. You must itemize your federal income tax return in order to be eligible for the credit. If you take the standard deduction, the tax credit benefit will not apply.

VOLUNTEER
Most people and companies support a charitable cause or volunteer in our community. Volunteering at one of the many organizations around the Valley that help the homeless is a rewarding and excellent way to give back to the community. Sonoran Property Maintenance, LLC volunteers in the kitchen at Phoenix Rescue Mission. The Phoenix Rescue Mission serves three meals per day, 365 days per year, to the homeless and other needy people.

PRINT OUT THIS DOCUMENT
We’ve created a print-out for you to give to the homeless you encounter at your properties to inform them of local assistance. There are dozens of soup kitchens around the Valley that provide free meals and accommodations. The list includes phone numbers and addresses of food banks and other organizations that offer assistance around the Valley. http://www.scribd.com/doc/117628953/117145549-Local-Assistance-for-the-Needy?secret_password=18iwj3yktrqlcftb1vav

HERE’S MORE!
Here’s a list of several Valley organizations that provide help to the homeless. For a complete list of Valley food banks and assistance programs, or to find one in your area, visit http://www.azfoodbanks.org/

Phoenix Rescue Mission
Website: http://phoenixrescuemission.org/
1801 S. 35th Ave.
Phoenix, AZ 85009-6706
602-346-3363

St. Mary’s Food Bank Alliance – 2 locations
Website: http://www.firstfoodbank.org/
Locations:
1) Surprise
13050 W. Elm St.
Surprise, AZ 85374
Phone: (602) 242-FOOD (3663)

2) University of Phoenix Center                                                                                           3003 W. Thomas Road                                                                                                     Phoenix, AZ 85009                                                                                                              Phone: (602) 242-FOOD (3663)

St. Vincent DePaul – 3 locations
Website: http://www.stvincentdepaul.net/index.htm
Locations:
1) Henry Unger Memorial Dining Room
1075 W. Jackson Street
Phoenix, AZ 85007
602-850-6753

2) Chris Becker Memorial Dining Room
9227 N. 10th Avenue
Phoenix, AZ 85021
(602) 261-6863

3) Dan O’Meara Center
420 W. Watkins Road
Phoenix, AZ 85003
(602) 850-6705

Central Arizona Shelter Services
Website: http://www.cassaz.org/
230 S. 12th Avenue
Phoenix, AZ  85007
(602) 256-6945

Community Network for Accessing Shelter
Website: http://phoenix.gov/law/victims/domesticviolence/contacs.html
602-263-8900

United Food Bank
Website: http://unitedfoodbank.org/
Email: info@unitedfoodbank.org
358 E Javelina Ave
Mesa, AZ 85210

Maricopa County Health Care for the Homeless
Website: http://www.maricopa.gov/publichealth/services/homeless/
220 S. 12th Avenue, Phoenix, AZ 85007
602.372.2100

André House
Website: http://andrehouse.org/
602-252-9023
213 S. 11th Ave
Phoenix, AZ 85007

The Respite Shelter for Homeless Men
Website: http://www.respiteshelter.org/
7000 N. Central Ave., Bldg F
Phoenix, AZ 85020
602-870-4353

Illegal Dumping – Electronics & Other Hazardous Waste

Illegal dumping at commercial properties is a big and costly problem these days.  Every day, sofas, appliances, landscape debris, tires and electronics are illegally dumped at the properties we serve.

Some items such as tvs and computer equipment are small enough to place in the dumpster; however, placing items containing hazardous waste in the dumpster is illegal.  These items cannot be safely placed in a landfill and must be recycled.

Electronics contain mercury and lead which are harmful to the environment. Electronic waste, known as e-waste, may not be placed with the regular trash.

The following is a partial list of items that may not be legally placed in the dumpster and must be removed from the property.

  • Televisions
  • Computers and monitors
  • Batteries
  • Fluorescent lights
  • Cell phones
  • VCRs, DVDs and CD players
  • Copy-scanner machines

Solution:

The best solution is to have convenient electronics recycling. In the meantime, here are a few solutions.

  • Place locks on dumpster enclosures.
  • Post “No Dumping” and “No Trespassing” signs.
  • Instruct tenants to report to the police when they see this crime.
  • Remove items are quickly as possible so the site doesn’t become a known dump location.

Additional resources:

http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/HomeHazWaste/Info/

http://swm.maricopa.gov/waste-tire.htm

http://swm.maricopa.gov/illegal-dumping.htm

Check out photos of the storm 7/21/12 !

How to Write an RFP for Optimal Results

Commercial real estate property managers are no doubt familiar with writing an RFP (request for proposal). It is their job not only to recognize a property’s maintenance and construction needs but also solve those issues as quickly and cost-effectively as possible. And while the RFP can be as short or long as the writer chooses to make it, the way that it is written can make a big difference in the solution that is offered.

Start by organizing your field notes. Review them carefully and highlight the items you believe deserve the highest priority.

Turn those organized notes into a more formal written proposal. Be as descriptive as possible but also concise. The recipient of the RFP wants to know:

  • What your company does
  • What the project entails
  • Requirements for project completion
  • Any technical information needed
  • The length of the project
  • Whom should be contacted for questions
  • When the contract will be awarded

The biggest challenge in writing an effective RFP is in knowing exactly what you want before the job has actually begun. A well-written RFP requires a company to consider all of a job’s “what ifs,” with a strong vision of both the outcome and adherence to the budget.

The Response 

Expect a timely turnaround on your proposal, and be wary of companies that drag their feet when responding. You should welcome questions, as they help to clarify the scope of the work before any significant financial commitment is made, but a company should emphasize problem solving, not problem creation. The way that a company responds to an RFP says a lot about that company and how they will do business with you in the future.

Handyman vs. General Contractor

When do I need a general contractor and when can I hire a handyman without a contractor’s license? This isn’t a question we want to think about when a tenant is demanding immediate repair of a leaky roof, when a new demising wall is required for a tenant to occupy, or when a vehicle damages a perimeter block wall. In fact, we want to hire the vendor who can get the job done quickly and cheaply.

Arizona Revised Statute §32-1121 requires that a contractor possess a current and active license even before bidding on a project. Violation of this statute constitutes a class 1 misdemeanor. Jobs up to $1,000 that do not require a building permit are considered “handyman” jobs, and these are exempt from the statute.

Thankfully, managers and owners have the option of hiring a cost-effective “handyman” for minor repairs requiring less than $1,000 in labor and materials. Handymen are not required to maintain a general contractor’s license.

You may hire a handyman only to find that the cost runs over the $1,000 handyman limit. Even if the handyman provides a certificate of insurance, the insurance may not cover work that requires a license. In other words, just because you have a certificate of insurance on file doesn’t mean you’re covered. Of course, hiring a licensed and insured general contractor does cost more.

General liability insurance protects the management company and the owner of the property provided these entities are named as additionally insured. However, even with a certificate of insurance, the property manager and owner may have exposure if the vendor unlawfully performs work without a license. Insurers may exclude coverage if the party performing the work is required to hold a license but does not.

A property owner, while managing his own property, decided to hire an unlicensed repairman in order to save on the cost. The repairman was in the business of small repairs, and he carried general liability insurance. The job involved minor electrical work, and eventually the job cost ran over the $1,000 handyman limit. Unfortunately, the work was not up to standard, and faulty wiring was the source of a costly fire. The insurance company refused to pay the claim stating the repairman performed work that required a license which he did not have. This is not a situation in which a property owner wants to find himself.

Workers’ compensation insurance is an even greater concern. Property managers should require their vendors to carry workers’ compensation insurance and provide evidence of the insurance. If an employee or subcontractor of a vendor with no workers’ compensation is injured on the job, the policy of the party who hired the vendor may be the policy that pays the claim.

Your best bet is to hire approved vendors with adequate general liability and workers’ compensation insurance for the unforeseen emergency as well as for day to day business.